9 thoughts on “Sharing visual art with vision-impaired museum visitors

  1. Pratima Kandel

    This is amazing and inspirational!! I have always admired the work involved in visual arts, while attending exhibition, the first thing that attracts me is the visual arts section. The artist that I met had shared some stories on how she expresses all of her feelings in creating such arts. I am glad art has further helped many people to control emotions and show the world their creativeness.

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  2. Emma Eichenberger

    This truly is amazing! I love how some museums do offer touch tours to the visually impaired; I didn’t even know that was a thing!

    I also found another story like this a few weeks ago that I thought was very awe-inspiring. Although some museums do allow people to touch more modern art, what about ancient and classical art? Like what the professor said, from a conservation standpoint, touching art can be damaging especially if it is old and in a fragile position. That’s why I wanted to share this article below. The National Gallery of Prague has developed a VR program connected to gloves that allow visitors to feel as if they are touching famous sculptures. They get that tactile experience without having to worry about the possible damage to the art through bacteria and oils. It’s really amazing!

    http://www.adweek.com/creativity/the-national-gallery-of-prague-is-using-vr-to-introduce-the-blind-to-iconic-sculptures/

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  3. Haley Russello

    It’s quite amazing that people are creating new ways for people to see and think about art. I like that the museums and artists are accommodating those that are unable to see the art.

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  4. Lucy Bondje

    Its very fascinating that they offfer an alternative visual experience for those that are visually impaired. Because it is jot fair that they were born with such an complication they dont get to truely enjoy the artist experience that is being provided for them to see. This accomadation is an advancement that can open up a broader audience in the artistic world.

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  5. Caroline Thompson

    This makes my heart very happy. Just because people are blind or impaired, doesn’t mean they shouldn’t enjoy art. Story telling and touching different objects to get a feel for what the art is thats in front of them is so unique and creative. This is a development in our society that allows everyone to enjoy art, no matter what. Loved this!

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  6. Beth Bayless

    I think that this is such an incredible thing to do, museums have always tried to provide services to those who need them and this is such a simple but incredible way to go about it. The idea to have a audio tour with touching elements or a touching tour is such a good way to experience a gallery.

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  7. Hunter Stephens

    This is something that hits home to me with my great grandfather slowly losing his eye sight I was worried he would not be able to enjoy art as he use to. He painted made ceramics and such, just the idea of having something available to those that are impaired is truly amazing. This gives me hope for others with impairments to either be able or continue feeling the beauty of art……

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  8. Carolyn Riley

    I never thought about how the blind might not be able to enjoy art museums the same way a person with sight might. When I think of art, I think of visuals and colors and shapes. To not be able to see art would make me very sad. Audio in its own way can be art too. The description of art by audio is also a powerful way to enjoy art because a person can understand what an artist is trying to convey through the emotion they speak with.

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  9. Alexis Anderson

    I found Georgina Kleege’s stance on the accessibility of art to the disabled incredibly refreshing. She implies that an equal exchange of information can exist between the sighted and the blind. She emphasizes that it should not be that the sighted dictate the experience of the blind, but that through the experience of touch the blind contribute to the sighted something that they are lacking. She demonstrates that each group provides unique and necessary perspectives to contribute to the discussion of the art community which is equally important to a complete understanding and interpretation of a work. For example, her interpretation of the materials used in the Golem by Elisabeth Higgins O’Connor and how it conveyed the fragility of the piece is a connection I would never have had the opportunity to make on my own.

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