Conservators at the Villa of the Mysteries, Pompeii

(Pasquale Sorrentino)
The stunning frescoes of the Villa of the Mysteries include one room with a painted frieze widely considered to depict an initiation rite into the cult of Dionysus, the god of wine, pictured at the center of this panel.

“Saving the Villa of the Mysteries: Beneath the surface of Pompeii’s most famous house,” By JARRETT A. LOBELL, Monday, February 10, 2014

Archaeology, A publication of the Archaeological Institute of America 

We do this here! Students curate exhibits!

From the New York Times, March 15, 2017.

On College Campuses, a New Role for Students: Museum Curator, b

Students from ARTH 317: Laboratory in Museum Studies, are curating an exhibition on the work of Margaret Sutton (1905-90), New York artist and 1926 graduate of Mary Washington. Opening is April 19, 2017.

https://nyti.ms/2mL3QxY

Destruction of Nimrud

“Islamic State is driven from ancient Nimrud, where destruction is ‘worse than we thought’ “

November 16 at 5:26 PM, The Washington Post, November 17, 2016

Read the article here.

The discovery of treasures in Nimrud's royal tombs in the late 1980s was one of the 20th century's most significant archaeological finds. (Hussein Malla/AP)

The discovery of treasures in Nimrud’s royal tombs in the late 1980s was one of the 20th century’s most significant archaeological finds. (Hussein Malla/AP)

“The Art of the Qur’an”…

“The Art of the Qur’an: Treasures From the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts,” is a new exhibit at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, D.C. on the Mall. Most works are on loan from a museum in Istanbul, and have never been on exhibit before. As Holland Cotter writes,

“The impression of the Washington exhibition is of splendor, not just from book to book and page to page, but within individual pages, with their nested divisions, their lustrous ornaments and their sprouting, rolling, singing Arabic phrases, which form the ethical heart of a faith and a culture.” The New York Times, Nov. 10, 2016.

Read the rest of Cotter’s review here. This is a spectacular and important exhibit.

 Visitors studying a folio from a large Quran dating to about 1400 in the exhibition “The Art of the Qur’an: Treasures From the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts,” at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington. Credit Justin T. Gellerson for The New York Times

Visitors studying a folio from a large Quran dating to about 1400 in the exhibition “The Art of the Qur’an: Treasures From the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts,” at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington. Credit Justin T. Gellerson for The New York Times

Here is a link to the Sackler and a short video about the works.

Prehistoric cave painting solves DNA mystery

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Black painting of the “Higgs bison” at Niaux cave in Ariège, France, dated to the Magdalenian period some 17,000 years ago. (D. Viet under Creative Commons licence via the University of Adelaide)

The ‘Higgs bison’ mystery is solved with the help of ancient cave paintings,” by Sarah Kaplan, in The Washington Post, October 18, 2016 (online), October 25, 2016, E6 (print).

New ideas on ancient Egypt

This evocative image of Amenemhat III depicts the son of Senwosret II in a similar style and with a similar emphasis on what seems to modern viewers as personality or soulfulness. It would have originally been painted. Anna-Marie Kellen/Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen)

This evocative image of Amenemhat III depicts the son of Senwosret II in a similar style and with a similar emphasis on what seems to modern viewers as personality or soulfulness. It would have originally been painted. Anna-Marie Kellen/Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen)

Here is a review of “Ancient Egypt Transformed,” by Philip Kennicott from The Washington Post, January 8, 2016.

This gold-covered fish pendant was probably worn as a hair ornament. It is about an inch-and-a-half long, yet detailed enough that the species can be identified: Synodontis batensoda. Anna-Marie Kellen/Trustees of the National Museums of Scotland)

This gold-covered fish pendant was probably worn as a hair ornament. It is about an inch-and-a-half long, yet detailed enough that the species can be identified: Synodontis batensoda. Anna-Marie Kellen/Trustees of the National Museums of Scotland)

Nebhepetre Mentuhotep II, an 11th Dynasty king, is credited with reunifying Egypt and establishing the Middle Kingdom. This statue, in a deliberately archaic style, is actually pieced together from two similar works that once stood at the king’s temple at Deir el-Bahri. Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Nebhepetre Mentuhotep II, an 11th Dynasty king, is credited with reunifying Egypt and establishing the Middle Kingdom. This statue, in a deliberately archaic style, is actually pieced together from two similar works that once stood at the king’s temple at Deir el-Bahri. Metropolitan Museum of Art)

By the middle of the 12th Dynasty, Egyptian kings such as Senwosret III were being depicted with strongly individual features, including marks of age and care. It was a remarkable development within a tradition that previously presented idealized images of the ruler, young, and often with a gentle or enigmatic smile. Anna-Marie Kellen/Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art)

By the middle of the 12th Dynasty, Egyptian kings such as Senwosret III were being depicted with strongly individual features, including marks of age and care. It was a remarkable development within a tradition that previously presented idealized images of the ruler, young, and often with a gentle or enigmatic smile. Anna-Marie Kellen/Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art)