Category Archives: Uncategorized

Global Guides at Penn Museum

“Refugees Connect Their Personal Stories with a Museum’s Ancient Artifacts”

“The Global Guides program at the Penn Museum hires recent refugees from the Middle East to give personalized tours. The leader of my tour was Moumena Saradar, a refugee from Syria who has lived in Philadelphia for two years.”

By Olivia Jia for Hyperallergic, 2/20/2019

Read the above article to see how one museum is connecting with refugees from the Middle East by hiring them to teach visitors about their culture, both ancient and contemporary.

Global Guides tour at Penn Museum, Moumena Saradar showcases similarities between her grandfather’s family business and the artifacts from Tepe Gawra (all photos by Olivia Jia for Hyperallergic)

Who translated cuneiform?

“You have to go back 4,000 years, colleagues said, to find someone as fluent in Sumerian as Miguel Civil. A Catalonian-born professor with a purported photographic memory, he spent decades studying ancient cuneiform tablets, examining the last wedge-shaped traces of what is probably the world’s oldest written language.” Read more here.

“A lexical list from the Early Dynastic period, item A3670 in the Oriental Institute’s collection. Dr. Civil was an expert on such lists, which featured terms in both Sumerian and Akkadian.”(Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago)

How do you move a really BIG work of art?

A short video from the New York Times, 9/7/14: “On Sunday, Picasso’s “Le Tricorne” was removed from the Seagram Building, where it had been on display for 55 years. Moving a canvas that age and size required extreme delicacy.”

http://nyti.ms/1tDuSqT

http://www.nytimes.com/video/nyregion/100000003098194/rolling-up-a-picasso.html?emc=edit_th_20140908&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=58726509

Pyrotechnics as art

Sometimes art works, sometimes it doesn’t.  Sometimes plans for works seem more complete than the finished work.  These are things to consider when we watch the video of “Explosion Event.”  Also ask yourself:  What do you expect to see when you hear about a holiday tree “exploding”?  Are you judging the event based on what’s possible in computer games or Hollywood?  Keep the materials in mind here, as well as the things one can’t plan for, such as the wind!

The artist, Cai Guo-Qing, is the last artist discussed in Janson (8th ed.).  Read this (p. 1106) before reading the articles and watching the video, then enjoy the video.

Here’s a link to the article in the Washington Post  (November 29, 2012);  be sure to watch the video of the event.

Here’s some background on the Sackler Museum and the artist…follow the links for more on the artist.