13 thoughts on “New views of Tut’s coffin

  1. John Tyler Funkhouser

    The coffin, or coffins of King Tut are are an example of the role death plays in Egyptian art. Coffins today are practical, usually one color and with little ornamentation . The outer coffin is gilded in gold. The innermost coffin is solid gold.

    Simply put in Egypt, coffins are works of art in their own right.

    Reply
  2. Erik Dale

    The coffin could also be an example of young monarchy, because King Tut died at the age of 13, his rule over Egypt was short. The tomb was later discovered in 1922 by Howard Carter.

    Reply
  3. Zadie Lacy

    The extensive use of gold in Ancient Egyptian culture is incredible in is creative and liberal usage. What is particularly interesting to me is how much of the data and information that we can gather from very old cultures like the Ancient Egyptians, the Etruscans, the Greeks, and the Romans centers around their funerary traditions. For example, we get another sense from the Etruscan Sarcophagus from Cerveteri, which contains a married couple, and depicts their statuettes as lounging at a banquet. Even in later Egyptian history, when we have evidence of the Ancient Egpytians “mixing” culturally with Romans in the 1st century CE, the funerary tradition remains the same of mummifying the dead and placing them (depending on their economic status) in sarcophogi. However the art on the front of the sarcophogus changes, incorporating encaustic painting on the front, and painting Romanesque style portraits of the deceased.

    Reply
  4. Josie Jerge

    I found it interesting that they removed the 2 inner coffins much earlier to be displayed and left the outer coffin in a sterilization tent. I also think it’s interesting to think of the practices of restoration today and the delicate procedures performed compared to the lack of care in earlier history such as the example given in class of Heinrich and Sofia Schliemann during their excavation.

    Reply
  5. Sara Z

    It’s incredible with how detailed and the amount of care and thought that was put into creating this tomb for one pharaoh. The ancient Egyptians’ culture is clearly shown through their use of material, particularly gold, and relief carvings. We can get a sense of what they prioritize in their culture, and the coffin tells a story(s) of Tutankhamen. It’s intriguing with how long it took for the innermost layer of the sarcophagus to be finally revealed to the public. That gives us a sense with how long the Art preservation process is for something that is large like this.

    Reply
  6. Emma Gardner

    I think it is amazing that people were able to create such masterpieces even for the dead. The craftsmanship and detail that went into creating this is amazing, it is fit for a king. I think that researchers are finally able to see the hardships and loops that artist had to go thought during this time.

    Reply
  7. Amanda Tringale

    King Tut’s Tomb is an astounding piece of ancient Egyptian artwork. The fact that the wooden top layer of the coffin is covered entirely in gold is fascinating. I still can’t believe that this tomb wasn’t stolen or torn apart and sold for its gold. When reading the article, I became very interested in the restoration process of this tomb as well. Historical restoration and preservation are very time consuming projects that take months and even years of dedication.

    Reply
  8. Jessica Thorne

    I am super glad that the outer coffin is being carefully restored now so that it can be shown along side the other artifacts and coffins that were found in King Tut’s tomb in 1922. While some might wonder why just this layer was left in a preservation tent, but it was probably because the archaeologists did not think they had sophisticated technology to successfully restore it and keep it safe. It is so amazing that so much was left in the tomb because of the sheer amount of gold, especially in the sarcophagus itself.

    Reply
  9. Alexander Ohene-Okae

    There is much to be said about the coffin itself and its value in the ancient Egyptian culture, however there is also much to be said about the practice of ‘conservation’ through the means of desecration of ancient burial sites. The work of scientist is certainly valuable and noble considering without their body of work this piece of the culture would likely be forgotten, however considering that we have long known that disturbing these graves is against the wishes of those buried their, I hope that we would have the decency to respect these last wishes. Ethically speaking is the information we gain from these graves more valuable then the peace of those who are buried their?

    Reply
  10. Margaret Neafsey

    I never knew that King Tut’s coffin was made up of three coffins put together. The fact that long ago, people went out of their way to make his coffin gold to make it fit for a king, shows how much power he had, in my eyes. Now, people are going out of their way to repair the outer coffin. It truly shows how important this was for history, providing insight for how royalty would be treated, beyond death.

    Reply
  11. Jordan Leahey

    I am really fascinated by ancient Egyptian culture, especially their process for burying the dead. Like how they put the organs of the dead in specific jars to hold them. You can just see the amount of work that these people put into Tut’s sarcophagus. It is very strange to me in some ways that they waited this long to truly restore this outer part, especially because of how long it has been since they discovered Tut’s tomb. Although reading into the article in more depth I understand now and I’m happy they took the time and care to restore this giant piece of art.

    Reply
  12. Jasper Drilling

    After reading about King Tut’s coffin, it is clear why he is referred to as the “golden Pharoah”. I was surprised that considering how young he was and that he died at the age of 19, he had such an extravagant coffin that had the outside covered in gold and an inner coffin of solid gold. However, this makes sense considering what a great value the ancient Egyptians placed on the dead. They would have wanted to respect him and ensure that he had a proper afterlife. Additionally, I found the article interesting because I didn’t know that there were separate coffins within each other, and the detail on the outside gold is beautiful.

    Reply
  13. Eriq Moreira-Ibar

    It amazes how much can be preserved over such long periods of time. I know with certain old/ancient buildings, certain techniques must be used in order to preserve or restore buildings properly. I hope that the findings and restoration of this coffin are properly conducted. Pieces like this provide great historical context to ancient Egypt’s society and culture.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *